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2002 Poverty Lines

February 5, 2003

The LICOs are published by Statistics Canada. Persons and families living below these income levels are considered to be living in "straitened circumstances." There are 35 different LICOs, varying according to family size and size of community. The LICOs are more popularly known as Canada's poverty lines.

Before-tax Low-Income Cut-Offs (LICOs), 2002
 Population of Community of Residence
Family Size500,000 +100,000-499,99930,000-99,999Less than 30,000*Rural
1 $19,261 $16,521 $16,407 $15,267 $13,311
2 $24,077 $20,651 $20,508 $19,083 $16,639
3 $29,944 $25,684 $25,505 $23,732 $20,694
4 $36,247 $31,090 $30,875 $28,729 $25,050
5 $40,518 $34,754 $34,512 $32,113 $28,002
6 $44,789 $38,418 $38,150 $35,498 $30,954
7 + $49,060 $42,080 $41,788 $38,882 $33,907

Notes: This table uses the 1992 base. Income refers to total pre-tax, post-transfer household income.

*Includes cities with a population between 15,000 and 30,000 and small urban areas (under 15,000).

Source: Prepared by the Canadian Council on Social Development using Statistics Canada's Low Income Cut-Offs, from The Daily, February 5, 2003.

Reading this table

Example: A family of four living in a very large Canadian city with an income (after transfers and before taxes) of less than $36,247 in 2002, would have been living below the poverty line. A similar family living in a village would not have been below the poverty line, unless their income was less than $25,050.

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Canadian Council on Social Development, 190 O'Connor Street, Suite 100, Ottawa, Ontario, K2P 2R3
Tel: (613) 236-8977, Fax: (613) 236-2750, Web: www.ccsd.ca, Email: council@ccsd.ca